Tag Archives: consumption

How will households react to the real income squeeze?

Philip Bunn and Jeremy Rowe

Rising inflation is eroding the spending power of UK households’ incomes.  How will they react to that?  The answer will make a big difference to the economic outlook.  Will they dip into savings and carry on buying the same amount of goods and services, or will they just spend the same and be able to buy less with it?  New survey evidence suggests that households intend to do a bit of both with nominal spending increasing by around half of the rise in prices but real consumption also falling.  But not all households say they will respond in the same way: households with debts and limited savings to fall back on are less likely to be able to increase spending.
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Filed under Macroeconomics, Monetary Policy

Less is more: what does mindfulness mean for economics?

Dan Nixon.

Economic theory generally assumes that more consumption means greater happiness. This post puts forward an alternative, “less is more” perspective based around the concept of mindfulness. It argues that we may achieve greater happiness by seeking to simplify our desires, rather than satisfy them. The result – less consumption but greater wellbeing – could be especially important for debates around secular stagnation and ecological sustainability.

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Filed under New Methodologies