Tag Archives: History

From Berlin to Basel: what can 1930s Germany teach us about banking regulation?

Tobias Neumann.

Two of the country’s largest banks collapse.  The subsequent panic brings the banking system to its knees and only a costly government bail-out prevents even greater catastrophe.  A radical re-think of regulation is needed.  No, it’s not London or New York in 2008.  It is Berlin in the 1930s.  It’s when risk-weighted capital regulation was born, notably to be used alongside a range of other tools; for example, liquidity requirements and such modern ideas as bonus deferrals and capital conservation.  But the idea that no single regulatory measure is likely to be sufficient on its own was forgotten.  In 2008 it had to be painfully re-learned making this episode a striking example of the importance of studying past financial crises.

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Filed under Banking, Economic History, Financial Stability, Microprudential Regulation

The cheque republic: money in a modern economy with no banks.

Ben Norman and Peter Zimmerman.

What happens when a country’s banking system shuts down?  Just how damaging is it to the economy?  During the 20th century, the Republic of Ireland’s banking system suffered industrial disputes, some of which caused the main banks to close for several months.  When Greek banks closed temporarily last year, some commentators (e.g. Independent (2015), FT (2015)) recalled how, previously, the Irish public ingeniously circumvented the banking system and kept economic activity going.  Using material in the Bank of England’s Archive relating to the 1970 dispute, we shed light on how halcyon those days really were.

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Filed under Banking, Economic History, Macroeconomics

BoE archives reveal little known lesson from the 1974 failure of Herstatt Bank

Ben Norman

In June of 1974, a small German bank, Herstatt Bank, failed. While the bank itself was not large, its failure became synonymous with fx settlement risk, and its lessons served as the impetus for work over the subsequent three decades to implement real-time settlement systems now used the world over. Documents from the Bank of England’s Archive shed light on a lesser known aspect of Herstatt’s failure – the chain reaction it caused across financial centres as banks in different countries delayed settling their payments to each other. The lesson for policymakers today to grapple with is: when a bank fails, could we still expect surviving banks to delay making payments, with a potential chain reaction in the payment system?

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Filed under Banking, Economic History, Financial Stability, Market Infrastructure, Resolution