Tag Archives: Labour market

Bitesize: The improvement in the gender labour force participation gap

Thomas Viegas and Gabija Zemaityte.

Many things have being trending down globally over the recent decades: real interest rates, productivity, world trade, you name it! And it’s generally acknowledged that these falls are problematic for policymakers. However, there is one downward trend which has been welcomed with open arms…

Continue reading

Comments Off on Bitesize: The improvement in the gender labour force participation gap

Filed under Bitesize, Economic History, International Economics, Macroeconomics

Global inflation: a laboured process

Bob Gilhooly, Gene Kindberg-Hanlon and Dan Wales.

The dramatic fall in the price of oil has had a marked effect on headline inflation across the world. In contrast, measures of core inflation (ex. food & energy) have been more stable suggesting, that once the base effects from oil drop out, headline rates of inflation should bounce back. However, while inflation rates around the world will mechanically pick up in the near-term, it is not clear that global labour markets are strong enough to drive inflation fully back to target.

Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under International Economics, Monetary Policy

Finding a Match

Bradley Speigner.

Is falling unemployment masking a broader deterioration in UK labour market performance? The ease with which a typical job seeker lands a job is a crucial indicator of the health of the labour market, which cannot be fully inferred from just a casual glance at the headline unemployment rate. It is true that unemployment has declined quite rapidly recently. But this is because job openings have been unusually abundant while the labour market’s capacity to match individual workers to available jobs quickly has actually worsened. This capacity is referred to as matching efficiency, and it started falling in the UK even before the 2008 recession.

Continue reading

Comments Off on Finding a Match

Filed under Macroeconomics

Does business intelligence still point to labour market slack?

Alastair Cunningham & Glynn Jones

One of the puzzles arising from the economic recovery has been the difficulty of squaring sharp falls in unemployment with – at least until recently – only slow growth in average earnings.   The common interpretation is that there’s still more slack than “normal” in the labour market.  However, in this post, we argue that there has been a more marked labour market tightening so that there is now slightly less slack than “normal”.  That suggests that earnings growth has been suppressed by factors other than labour market slack – leaving a risk that wage inflation will pick up sharply if and when those factors wash out.

Continue reading

Comments Off on Does business intelligence still point to labour market slack?

Filed under Macroeconomics

Skills matter: The changing workforce and the effects on pay and productivity

Matthew Corder

Pay and productivity growth over the past couple of years have remained weak despite a rapid fall in unemployment and robust GDP growth.  But these aggregate measures in the UK reflect the sum of a diverse range of individuals in the workforce.  Changes in the mix of that workforce, therefore, can affect pay and productivity growth.  Based on analysis of the determinants of individual workers’ wages, I estimate that changes in the mix of the workforce may account for about 1pp of the recent weakness in annual average pay growth relative to normal. Continue reading

Comments Off on Skills matter: The changing workforce and the effects on pay and productivity

Filed under Macroeconomics, Monetary Policy